“I Think I Got My Dad’s Teeth”

When my wife confirmed to me she was pregnant with our first child, I knew big changes were coming. The stunning announcement of pregnancy brought me both joy and extreme anxiety.  The biggest stress was not the actual nine months of pregnancy (my wife was healthy and strong, tip-top health) but  a result of me unsuccessfully attempting to predict the unknown future.

The actual pregnancy was classic and uneventful. As an expecting father, I gained my customary 8 pounds in sympathy. February 20th, arrived, game day in the delivery room at Norwalk Hospital. Liza wasn’t a screamer during the delivery process, just some groans now and then for about 5 hours. Like I said, she’s tough.

Delivery was natural and smooth, no complications. It felt like it was all happening too fast. Then ,out of no where a little alien appeared.  “That’s my son?”  I see this little scrawny humanoid thing in the doctor’s hands. Birth is an incredible feeling to witness live. You dads know what I’m talking about. I knew in an instant, my life had just changed in an instant.  Extreme joy and the weight of immense pressure in the same sandwich.

In seconds after delivery, the nurse swept my son from the doctor’s safe arms and confirmed vitals and other tests nearby.  Soon after, he was confirmed by the nurse and deemed healthy and beautiful, he was lovingly brought to mom’s loving embrace, swaddled and nursed. This was truly a breath-taking experience to witness. The nature of instant bond between child and mom is magical. My son was then placed in the radiant incubator which minimize further trauma from the delivery.

As I approached the warming bed to embrace my boy, which was now positioned besides his mom, I witnessed the power of genetics.  Exhausted, content sleeping under the warm light, supine, tightly swaddled,  snug blue head skull-cap fitted, with his tiny right arm conveniently popped out from the soft white blanket, with backhand to his forehead. “That’s me when I sleep”,  I thought out loud. Right hand on my head is where I find the most comfort and relaxation. “It’s my move and now, my son’s move.”

Nature or Nurture, that is the age-old question. It’s actually both. Everything is genetically driven. We are a function of our DNA. The rule is 80% genetic and 20% environmental. There are millions upon millions of characteristics that we have inherited that defines our phenotype.

We are products of our DNA. From our attitude to the gait in our walk; we are our parents, the good and bad. Tooth shape, tooth shade, predisposition to tooth decay, predisposition to periodontal disease, jaw alignment………. everything.

The 20% is our ability to change and modify to create a healthier lifestyle. You are in control of your 20%.

Brush more per day and eat the right foods. Stay away from candy and sugary drinks so you get fewer cavities than your mom or dad. You are still getting cavities, but fewer……..

Get those braces so that your teeth are in a better alignment so that your toothbrush has better accessibility to the your entire mouth.

Get your teeth cleaned more frequently than two times year because your mom lost all her teeth due to periodontal disease before the age of fifty. Get an electric tooth-brush, a Waterpick and floss regularly.

Give up smoking because you know your dad died from oral cancer.

Don’t eat late at night,  stay away from  acidic foods, and cut back on the coffee in order to help prevent root caries,

So let’s embrace our genetics and try to abide by some simple philosophies.

It’s my approach to tackle hardship in life. It works for me. It took me twenty years get here. I try not to question or get frustrated too much about stuff I can’t control.

However I do my best, to make changes in order to make up for my short comings and embrace the facts.

Making positive choices in your lifestyle, may or may not make a difference in the role our genetics play but it certainly can help create a more meaningful existence!

 

Dedicated to Rob A. New dad and patient

 

Dr. Emilio & Associates,  Always Accepts  New Patients. He especially exceeds at treating same day emergencies patients suffering from tooth ache pains.

His goal is to keep his patients’ Teeth and Gums Healthy For Life.

Feel Free to appoint a Consultation with the Doctor. Open Six Days A Week

OPEN on Weekdays.  7:30am -8:00pm  (M<T<W<T)

Fridays.  7:30am-2:00pm

Weekends (Saturday only).  8:00am-2:00pm

111 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.

You can always contact me directly via email  blog@robertemiliodds.com

Instagram:  dentist_in_connecticut

Office (203)866-7164      www.robertemiliodds.com

Pass this Link to Your Friends:  robertemilioddsblog.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

What’s Oil Pulling?

Oil pulling, involves trapping a tablespoon of oil in your mouth and moving your cheeks with your closed lips for around 20 minutes or so. This pulling technique has been around for thousands of yearsWebMD.  There is some opinion out there that this action of oil pulling eliminates general body ailments such as hangovers, sleep disorders and skin diseases. This swishing with the oil supposedly draws  toxins out from your body, to improve your overall health. I dont believe those claims one bit.

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Clinically, as a dental health care observer/provider,  I do see a benefit from the oral aspect with less plaque accumulation as noted in routine hygiene follow ups by my patients who practice this technique consistently on a daily basis.

I do not  “Oil Pull” because it’s difficult for me to consistently find twenty minutes in my day where I am not interrupted, asked a question or simply bombarded with stuff needing immediate attention home and office alike. For those of you who know me, I got to talk. It is impossible for me to sit there, silently, swishing, suppressing my opinion or thought from being verbally expressed.  I do believe it’s a worth the while if you can find the time in your daily routine. Think of it as “another feature in your dental home care cap.”

My Choice Oil is Coconut Oil.

Coconut Oil is antimicrobial. A particular study demonstrated that coconut pulling significantly reduced the number of cavity producing bacteria called Strepococcus Mutans study . Yes! You can potentially get fewer cavities if there is lesser of a concentration of the destructive bacteria in your mouth.

Coconut Oil contains Lauric Acid and is the active triglyceride that kills bacteria that creates gum problems. A decrease in the amount of bacteria decreases your gum’s inflammatory response, better known as ginivitis. Less gingivitis is a good thing.

Coconut Oil also has anti fungal properties. People who get fungal diseases of the mouth most often have dentures or are undergoing radiation or chemotherapy treatment.

How about keeping your teeth as white as possible? Don’t panic, it’s organic…….Oil in general is a lubricant and creates a lower surface tension on your teeth and gums so that the bacteria and stains just slide off your teeth and gums resulting in displaying you beautiful white teeth.

And Finally, Coconut Oil tastes good. Who doesn’t love coconut embedded foods? Coconut Shrimp, Coconut Cake, Macaroons; my top three favorites. That’s all good stuff, right?

Coconut Oil Pulling Technique

1-Brush your teeth properly

2-Take a tablespoon of Coconut Oil and use it like mouthwash.

3-Go for it! Do Not swallow..

4-After 20 minutes spit the oil in the trash. You don’t want to clog the plumbing of the house or septic system. The oil may solidify in your pipes.

 

It’s not the cure-all. You still need to brush your teeth and see me for regular check ups.

PS. My wife Actually got this great tasting Coconut Toothpaste from Whole Foods.  If you want the name of it, you’ll have to subscribe to my blog. LOL. Just kidding, shoot me an email for the request.

 

Dr. Emilio & Associates,  Always Accepts  New Patients. He especially exceeds at treating same day emergencies patients suffering from tooth ache pains.

His goal is to keep his patients’ Teeth and Gums Healthy For Life.

Feel Free to appoint a Consultation with the Doctor. Open Six Days A Week

OPEN on Weekdays.  7:30am -8:00pm  (M<T<W<T)

Fridays.  7:30am-2:00pm

Weekends (Saturday only).  8:00am-2:00pm

111 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.

You can always contact me directly via email  blog@robertemiliodds.com

Instagram:  dentist_in_connecticut

Office (203)866-7164      www.robertemiliodds.com

Pass this Link to Your Friends:  robertemilioddsblog.wordpress.com

 

Do I Still Need To Take My Antibiotics?

I recently had a wonderful elderly female patient who was complaining of jaw pain status/post Third Molar (wisdom tooth) extraction in my office.

The previous day, I had extracted the fractured vital tooth. Beautifully removed with minimal effort and stitched up to perfection by me. Her Past Medical History was unremarkable. She was taking no medications of concern that should have alerted me to potentially a risky post operative recovery.  I had no reason to believe there could be an issue with the post operative care of the area.

Dry socket is always a concern. Dry socket ( alveolar osteomyelitis) is a condition where the extraction site clot is dislodged and the underlying bone of the socket gets exposed to the harsh oral environment. This is a very painful situation such that the pain is unique and radiates thru your entire jaw, face and neck on the side of the tooth extraction. Although a rare occurence for my patients, clinical experience demonstrates a higher predisposition to dry socket in the lower third molar area than any other area in the mouth.

She was in pain. She was feeling drawn out and called me directly on my emergency contact. Timing was essential and aided in my diagnosis of the origin of post operative pain.

The patient stated that she was sore and feeling slightly febrile the very next day; I estimated, twenty-four hours since the surgical event.

“I need antibiotics to Knock Out the infection” , she stated with confidence. She continued on stating that she was ,”….. a bit febrile,,,,I’m running a bit higher than usual”.

I conceded and with a very slight reluctance, but obeyed to the wisdom of this implacable women. I prescribed the antibiotics because I respected the patient’s desires. I do believe that some patients can be their best and worst doctors. It’s definitely was possible she was in the early cascade of infection,,, most likely, not. She presented initially non infected. It was too early for in infection to be present so soon after the extraction. Typically, infection would start on the THIRD DAY after a surgical event.

I called her one day after the initiation of the antibiotic therapy and she stated, “I am feeling so much better now. Thank you.  Do I need to finish the antibiotics?”

MY ANSWER WAS…EMPHATICALLY…….. YES!

My feeling was such that she was not truly infected, but instead feeling beat up from the extraction  event (the message not the messenger). Post operative edema peaks 24-36 hours a surgical event; that’s when the post extraction pain was the worst.

Dental extractions are always traumatic. It involves, local anesthesia which initiates an Adrenaline rush through your system. In response to the needle shot in anticipation of the surgical event, corticosteroids get surged out from your adrenal glands to help cope and compensate for the traumatic event you are about to endure; this is the Flight or Fright response. This is a totally natural occurring biological response to an average dental visit (comparable to getting charged by a saber tooth tiger—-that’s a joke….). It’s Normal to feel zonked after seeing me for a denatl procedure.  You will be tired the next day, especially after an extraction.

The patient’s febrile component was most likely associated with a slight dehydration effect that impacts body temperature in the slightest fashion. That’s why it’s important to drink your fluids. It’s on the post op instruction sheet..

Upon follow-up phone call, on the Second day after extraction, and one single dose of antibiotic, she reported to be just fine…Her next question was,  “Do I need to finish my antibiotic?”

Yes, was my response the current theory states that :” Treating bacterial infections with an antibiotic kills those bacteria, but this may take a week or more to accomplish. If you stop treatment early, you have only killed the weaker of the bacteria, those bugs most readily wiped out by the antibiotic. The ones leftover are the tougher bacteria, which would have been killed if the treatment continued but now, in the absence of antibiotics, have room to multiply and pass their genetic-based resilience to their progeny. Next time around, the infection is that much tougher.” Finishing your antibiotic

However, the same article states the mindset of this theory is changing. Each situation of infection type needs to be addressed individually. The debate is duration time period of antibiotic consumption. An Excellent read. I suggest you read the details.

Dedicated To Regina.

 

Dr. Emilio & Associates,  Always Accepts  New Patients. He especially exceeds at treating same day emergencies patients suffering from tooth ache pains.

His goal is to keep his patients’ Teeth and Gums Healthy For Life.

Feel Free to appoint a Consultation with the Doctor. Open Six Days A Week

OPEN on Weekdays.  7:30am -8:00pm  (M<T<W<T)

Fridays.  7:30am-2:00pm

Weekends (Saturday only).  8:00am-2:00pm

111 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.

You can always contact me directly via email  blog@robertemiliodds.com

Instagram:  dentist_in_connecticut

Office (203)866-7164      www.robertemiliodds.com

Pass this Link to Your Friends:  robertemilioddsblog.wordpress.com

“Does Candy and Drinking Hot Tea Give You Cavities?” …. Leslie asks

Yes, and most definitely yes.

Go to the interview Leslie and her Candy.

Candy and sugar are synonymous.

Black licorice a particular favorite of mine, I’ll admit is a triple threat. Consisting of sugar, it’s notorious for plucking away perfectly good dental work, such as crowns, off of unsuspecting teeth. The black coloring adds the extra drama of the unbrushed teeth look. Next Halloween, if want to give your hygienist a nightmare recall visit, make a quick snack of it on the way over to the office for your appointed time. Drinking hot tea just melts things away creating a more hydrodynamically  homogeneous sugary environment that will actually create the worst kind of cavities; root decay. The hot liquid sugar just sits on the soft vulnerable part of the tooth with the bacteria laying down acid  gnawing away creating big dental problems.

Dental decay involves plaque formation. When candy is consumed and if the sugars aren’t cleaned off your teeth, the naturally present bacteria in your mouth feed on the candy and produce destructive acids. The acids dissolve away the enamel of the tooth, hence a cavity.

There is some good news. If you want that candy, go for it!

Studies show that if you brush your teeth properly within 12 minutes of consuming the candy, no changes will occur in the enamel.

 

Dr. Emilio & Associates,  Always Accepts  New Patients. He especially exceeds at treating same day emergencies patients suffering from tooth ache pains.

His goal is to keep his patients’ Teeth and Gums Healthy For Life.

Feel Free to appoint a Consultation with the Doctor. Open Six Days A Week

OPEN on Weekdays.  7:30am -8:00pm  (M<T<W<T)

Fridays.  7:30am-2:00pm

Weekends (Saturday only).  8:00am-2:00pm

111 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.

You can always contact me directly via email  blog@robertemiliodds.com

Instagram:  dentist_in_connecticut

Office (203)866-7164      www.robertemiliodds.com

Pass this Link to Your Friends:  robertemilioddsblog.wordpress.com

Is Bleaching Bad For My Teeth?

Everything in moderation is what I say. In general, teeth whitening, better known as teeth bleaching is safe. In moderation, it will not damage the enamel of your teeth.

Whitening gel varies in formulations with concentrations ranging  from 35%  to 10% carbamide peroxide with application times for around  30 minutes, once a day, for 7-10 days.

The process of bleaching will lead to increased sensitivity because it opens up the internal pores of the teeth. This allows the bleach to penetrate the tooth, lifting particulate debris  to the teeth’s surface resulting in a whiter overall smile.  TIP: To prevent this uncomfortable feeling of cold and air sensitivity during and after the process,  it is best to use a special toothpaste with potassium-nitrate in its formulation soon after the gel is brushed off and away.  Any over the counter “for sensitive teeth” brands works well to minimize the lingering after effects of tooth zingers after the process. It may take a couple of weeks to get back to normal; ie less hypersensitivity.

The best time to whiten your teeth is soon after your hygiene appointment. All surface stains and tartar will have been properly removed by my hygienist and your stain free polished enamel will be ready for maximum  whitening potential from the whitening gel.

Teeth whitening is temporary. Any restorative material that’s non enamel will not lighten in shade. After whitening, sometimes composite restorations will need to be changed over to match the existing previously placed bonding.  Remember, whitening does not last. Your tooth does fade back to the original shade within 6 months or so.

Whiten  may not be an option for you if you have anterior composite work existing. Another consideration for a permanent shade is ceramic veneers or ceramic crowns. This would be a more definitive long-term suitable result for you. Ceramic does not stain. Ask me next time you come in for your hygiene check if Ceramic Whitening is an option for you. Or if you can’t wait, make an appointment for a consultation to address your specific needs.

Some More Tips if  You do Bleach Your Teeth:

Continue the process at home using a whitening toothpaste

Utilize a straw to consume dark beverages. Not recommended with hot coffee,,,, LOL.

Cut out tobacco products.

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Dr. Emilio & Associates,  Always Accepts  New Patients. He especially exceeds at treating same day emergencies patients suffering from tooth ache pains.

His goal is to keep his patients’ Teeth and Gums Healthy For Life.

Feel Free to appoint a Consultation with the Doctor. Open Six Days A Week

OPEN on Weekdays.  7:30am -8:00pm  (M<T<W<T)

Fridays.  7:30am-2:00pm

Weekends (Saturday only).  8:00am-2:00pm

111 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.

You can always contact me directly via email  blog@robertemiliodds.com

Instagram:  dentist_in_connecticut

Office (203)866-7164      www.robertemiliodds.com

Pass this Link to Your Friends:  robertemilioddsblog.wordpress.com